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A large fallen tree with orange leaves blocks a Winnipeg road after the huge October 2019 snowstorm.
A large fallen tree with orange leaves blocks a Winnipeg road after the huge October 2019 snowstorm.

Winnipeg tree apocalypse, Tree-maggedon, fall snowstorm—call it what you want.

We called it The Reason We Train.

Below, we’ll tell you exactly how much you need to work out to be just fine when nature puts unavoidable obstacles in your way.

 

What’s a Little Snow to a Fit Winnipegger?

 

Our members regularly tell us their friends think they’re crazy for spending time in the gym when they could be parked on the couch with some snacks and a good movie.

“Why do you work out all the time?”

“Why do you want to learn to lift things?”

“What’s the point of getting all sweaty?”

We’ve heard all the questions over the last decade.

But you know who didn’t bat an eye when Tree-Pocalypse showed up with about 34 cm of wet snow?

People who work out.

 

Worst October Storm Ever?

 

The recent Manitoba storm was an incredible act of nature. Early last week, the sun was shining and it was beautiful enough to go for a bike ride in shorts and a T-shirt. By the end of the week, the wet snow was still coming, and trees were falling onto power lines, cars and even people all over the province.

The province and city declared states of emergency, and people were evacuated.

“Unprecedented Snowstorm Forces State of Emergency in Manitoba”

The city’s precious urban forest was decimated, and Manitoba Hydro was dealing with damage that had never been seen before.

The event forced people to be physical. Some had to clear trees out of driveways, others had to travel to find warmth, and all had to deal with a huge amount of wet, heavy snow.

For people who regularly work out, snow and downed branches weren’t a problem. Inconvenient for sure. But not a problem.

And we aren’t talking about people who do crazy two-hour workouts seven days a week. We’re talking about professionals, students, moms and grandpas who set aside about 2 percent of their week to work on their fitness.

What Does It Take to Get Fit?

To increase your fitness, you need to work out about two to three times per week. That’s not perfect, but it’s a good start.

Let’s be clear: For the general population of healthy people, we recommend four to six structured, professionally planned workouts a week, as well as general physical activity such as dog walking, yard work and so on. That would be optimal, and it would get you to your goals much faster.

But some people don’t have time for four to six sessions. We understand.

And we know from 10 years of training that we can measurably improve your fitness with two or three sessions a week—about two or three hours. You won’t get fit as fast as someone who trains more often, but in this case, something is much better than nothing.

Here’s the key: the sessions must be designed to get results. If you’re going to invest two or three hours in your fitness every week, you need to be sure that you’re getting the most out of your time.

What should you do for how long? What should you lift? How should you lift it? Do you need to do cardio? How often?

For the average person, it can be very difficult to create a plan that gets results. There are too many variables. That’s why people who sign up go to a gym often become confused by all the equipment, intimidated by the atmosphere and frustrated by the lack of results.

We understand. That’s why we design appropriate workouts and coach everyone in our facility.

 

Confused or Frustrated? We Can Help!

 

Sometimes we coach in a group setting, where a skilled trainer modifies a general workout for each person. In other cases, we work one on one with clients to design programs that are perfectly suited for their age, training history, injuries, availability and goals. In some cases we work with clients one on one at intervals and assign them workouts to do on their own.

You can get very fit by following each of those plans.

In fact, you will see significant results by training properly two or three times a week for three months. Many people are so amazed by the results that they invest more time in their health, and they start training three to five times a week. 

But in the aftermath of Tree Apocalypse, it’s worth explaining that if you are currently inactive, we can help you see measurable improvements in just two or three hours a week. You can supercharge that investment by eating better, which doesn’t take much time at all. We can teach you about food, too.

When we say “measurable,” we mean that you will be able to see improvements in your workout log: more weight lifted, a better time, and so on. You’ll also see results in weight and clothing sizes. It’s likely that your doctor will notice changes in your blood work and vital stats at your next check-up. 

But you’ll also feel better. Maybe you can’t put a number on that, but the confidence you get from fitness is incredibly valuable.

And you will feel more confident. Trust us on that.

 

Start Slow—and Enjoy the Results!

 

Don’t feel overwhelmed if you want to start a fitness program. You can start slowly and still see results.

This is true at any age. For example, we have members over 70 who train twice a week and see marked improvements in strength, conditioning and body composition.

If you want to feel confident the next time it snows, start training now. Just two or three hours a week. We’d be happy to show you how to invest that valuable time.

If you’d like some guidance, click the button below to talk to a coach who shoveled out of Tree-Maggedon and would like to help you get ready for the next Winnipeg snowstorm.

I Want to Be Fitter!

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