Tag: nutrition

An egg-white frittata as part of a healthy diet.

You’ve had a body-composition scan—so now what?

A recent Winnipeg Free Press article talked in detail about body-composition scans. In the Free Press article, writer Doug Speirs published the results of his scan, which revealed his body fat was too high: 42.2 percent. The healthy range for males is about 18-24, and athletes are in the range of 6-13. On the positive side, Speirs had good bone density and carried a solid amount of muscle. That’s fantastic.

Perhaps you’ve already been scanned somewhere with a Dexa or Fit3D machine. If you haven’t, we have an InBody machine that can tell you your weight, your body-fat percentage, your muscle mass and resting metabolic rate in about 20 seconds.

But here’s the real question:

How do you improve the numbers on the printout?

It’s one thing to know what you’re made of, but it’s another to change it. That’s where we come in.

We’re experts at interpreting the results of body-composition scans and providing an exercise and diet prescription that will help you make positive changes.

For example, if Speirs brought his scan to us, here’s what we’d suggest:

Step 1: If Doug is not active in any way, we’d recommend some activity. Something is better than nothing, and going to a gym with a specific plan is even better.

Step 2: If Doug is currently working out, we’d have him prioritize weight training to ensure he maintains muscle mass while we reduce body fat. Lean muscle mass has incredible metabolic effects, and we don’t want him to lose much muscle. Doug’s boss trains with us, so he has a ride to our gym. 

Step 3: From there, we’d look at Doug’s diet. We’d reference his resting metabolic rate and his activity levels, and we’d prioritize protein in his diet to help retain or build muscle mass. Then we’d adjust caloric intake to target fat loss, likely by changing the sources of carbs and fat in his diet. For example, we might recommend extra lean ground beef on a bed of spinach instead of a greasy burger and french fries. We’d prioritize reasonable amounts of whole foods, and we would absolutely get rid of any forms of liquid sugar.

Step 4: We’d have Doug log his food intake, and we’d make adjustments as needed. We’d meet with him regularly and scan him to make sure things are moving in the right direction—and we’re positive that they would be if he combined exercise and sound nutrition.

If you read the Free Press article and are interested in determining your body composition and making changes to it, contact us. We can help! Come to us with your scan results or book a scan with us, followed by a consultation.

For more information about body-composition scanning, click here.

For more info about 204 Lifestyle nutrition and food services, click here.

204 Lifestyle and D.A. Niels would like to invite you to a very special evening of wine, appetizers, education and shopping.

There is no cost, but we ask that you RSVP either to crystal@crossfit204.com or via Facebook. Neil, Analyn and their staff will be opening the store just for our honoured guests. As many of you know, Neil and Analyn are founding members of our Legends fitness program, and we’re thrilled to partner with them for this event.

When: Friday, Dec. 1, 6-8 p.m. 

Where: D.A. Niels., 485 Berry Street, right next to the gym.

What:

– 204 Lifestyle’s Crystal Kirby-Peloquin and Joanna Gies, RD, will present a host of holiday hacks and nutrition tips for staying fit and healthy during the holidays.

– Beverages and appetizers provided.

– D.A. Niels will generously offer 20 percent off on purchases. Feature item: Wine glasses with clever, stylish measuring marks to make macro tracking easy. If you need any kitchenware—including scales and measuring cups—don’t miss this event.

Please RSVP by Nov. 27.

Stay the course.

It’s as simple as that.

Maybe that isn’t a hack, but I think steering in the same direction is far less work than making a bunch of turns. For example, I spend a bit of time on the California freeway system, and everything is A-OK when you’re motoring onward. Leaving the freeway involves all kinds of ramps and turns and traffic lights, and the very kind GPS woman usually gets very upset at some point.

So stay on the freeway.

This is, of course, an analogy for nutrition and healthy eating. We planned the 204 Lifestyle Nutrition Reset for 28 days, but here’s the thing: This is how you should be eating. You should be consuming appropriately measured amounts of food in the proper macronutrient ratio. This is one of the great secrets of health and longevity.

As the challenge winds down, you have two choices:

1. You can say “thank heaven that’s over,” throw the scale and measuring cups in the drawer, eat anything you like and wait for our next nutrition challenge.

2. You can stay the course and continue eating appropriate quantities of high-quality food.

Option 1 is a poor choice. We’ll respect your decision, of course. But we’re not going to agree with it. We want you to be healthy, and we know that a good diet is critical. You cannot outwork a bad diet in the gym, and poor nutrition will cost you. Maybe not right now. But it will cost you big time down the road.

Option 2 is staying on the freeway. Over the last weeks, you’ve changed your behaviour and your patterns. You’ve consistently made better decisions. You’ve tried to eat the right amount of food in the right combinations as often as you can. You’ve allowed yourself a few planned indulgences, and you’ve forgiven yourself for mistakes. You’ve taken a lot of steps in the right direction, and your InBody scans at the end of the challenge are going to show that.

We’ve reviewed your progress throughout the challenge, by the way, and we can tell you that the results are very, very impressive. You guys have literally changed your lifestyles and laid the foundation for long-term health, happiness and fitness.

You have an exit approaching on Oct. 28, and, just as in California, there is a fast-food restaurant at the bottom of the off-ramp.

But you have to make a choice to get of the freeway you’re currently on. You have to actively choose to stop doing what your doing and eat poorly.

Don’t make that choice. Use what you’ve learned over the last weeks. You’ve got a map now, and you know how to get where you need to go. You’re full of high octane fuel, and the engine is humming.

Ignore the off-ramp, stomp the accelerator and turn up the radio. We’ll see you at the vegetable stand down the road.

To sign up for our revised 204 Lifestyle Trellis Program, click here.

Eat like Einstein.

Or something like that.

I actually have no idea how Albert Einstein ate, but I’d guess he didn’t want to hit that new hipster restaurant to sample its many craft beers and appetizers.

Einstein famously always dressed the same, apparently to save brainpower. While his obvious lack of fashionability horrifies my wife, it makes a lot of sense to me. I, of course, am not fashionable unless I’m at a rock concert, in which case I fit right in.

But even Barack Obama talked about trimming his wardrobe and limiting his food choices.

“You’ll see I wear only gray or blue suits. I’m trying to pare down decisions. I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make,” he said in Vanity Fair.

I dig it. I am a creature of habit, and I love routine. This above all has helped me with my diet.

I have had the same breakfast 95 percent of the time for the last decade. I’ve eaten the same lunch, more or less, for the last 5 years. Dinner is a bit more varied, but it’s generally meat with a lot of vegetables. When I go to restaurants, I usually order the exact same thing every time. Boring, I know. But it makes me happy.

This consistency is really helpful because I don’t have to worry about accounting for new foods and experiments in my diet. Maybe I’ll never experience the ecstasy of beef bourguignon poutine or some other trendy dish, but I’m OK with that. I have established a baseline, and over the last decade it’s helped me maintain my weight almost perfectly. If things ever get weird, I simply make a minor adjustment to a known quantity of food.

That actually happened a little while ago when I changed to a lower-calorie protein powder in my morning shake and I accidentally lost 10 lb. in about six weeks. This was not a good thing. I switched back to the other product and I got back to my optimal weight quickly. Performance was better, and I won’t be making any more changes to the recipe.

Variety might be the spice of life, but it also adds a lot of variables to the mix. And I really don’t like spicy food anyway.

I’m not suggesting you can’t be a culinary Marco Polo a chart an intrepid course through the menu, but if you’re not into macro tracking and want results, it’s a good idea to go with what you know as often as possible.

Crystal spends a lot of time tracking every single thing she eats, and she gets great results because she’s committed. I’d recommend you track everything. It will bring great results. But I just don’t have the patience for constant tracking, so my hack is to stick to a baseline plan that works and make note of alterations to that plan. I want to be healthy, and I love a good routine. I know that if I eat the same things just about every day and get the results I want, I don’t have to track a thing. I just have to stay the course.

If you’re ever frustrated with tracking, just remember that the early period is an investment, and it will pay off. You need to establish your baseline. Once you know what you need, you can streamline things considerably. If you eat the same things two days in a row, copy and paste, and you’ll find you have more time to organize all your blue suits by hue, from lightest to darkest.

For more info on nutrition, check out 204 Lifestyle.

 

I guess it was a “sugar hangover.”

For a brief period just after high school, my drink of choice as a Kahlua mudslide. I was young and silly, and I knew nothing, Jon Snow. I hadn’t a clue about nutrition, health and fitness. I only knew that my seashell necklace was super cool.

After a night of too many mudslides, I’d wake up with a crippling headache. Like the kind of headache that makes you want to drill a hole in your head to make it hurt less.

This was no ordinary hangover. This was something different. I’m almost certain it was sugar overload. Check this out:

Kahlua mudslide, 200 ml: 480 calories, 57 g sugar

To put those astronomical figures into perspective, consider that a 355 ml can of Coke has about 140 calories and 35 g of sugar.

When I did an InBody scan recently, it said my basal metabolic rate was 2,063 calories.

So, needless to say, drinking more than 2,000 calories of sugar in a few hours was not ideal.

Over the years, I learned more about nutrition and grew out of my frosted-tips phase. Training become more important, and I started to think about what I put in my body. Some research suggested that I could significantly reduce calories and improve fitness by simply avoiding sugary beverages.

Drinking less or no alcohol is always better for health, of course, but for the sake of this article, let’s assume you are going to have a drink. Here’s what you do:

– Avoid all complicated mixed drinks. The fewer ingredients the better.

– Avoid all sugary mixes, both sodas and juices.

– Stick to low-calorie spirits such as gin and vodka, either on the rocks or with water, or consider mixing with sparkling water and a hint of lemon or lime.

– Limit intake. This is a good idea, period. Alcohol is empty calories. Try to stick to one or two drinks on special nights. Definitely avoid evenings of excess.

Here’s a favourite beverage that won’t derail your diet if you plan ahead to accommodate the calories here:

Gin Rickey

1-1.5 oz. gin

half a lime

sparkling water

Squeeze the lime into a highball glass and chuck the whole thing inside. Fill with ice. Pour in 1-1.5 oz. gin, then top with sparkling water.

The gin rickey is a great option that won’t ruin your nutrition. You’re looking at about 110 calories from the gin (1.5 oz.) and maybe 3 calories from the lime. Drink it slowly and savor it as the ice melts. You can nurse one of these for quite a while. And you can also pour the next one without the gin for a refreshing mocktail.

The best advice: Plan ahead to accommodate the calories from alcohol in your diet, avoid sugary drinks, limit intake, and don’t dress like I dressed when I was 20.

As most of you know, Crystal is the nutrition expert in our family, and I benefit from her passion for food and commitment to healthy eating.

My role is very different: In addition to being in charge of all guitar solos, I am a very pragmatic, practical person. I like running perfectly organized full loads in the dishwasher. I like using one match to light all the candles even if I burn my finger. I like to eat the same things almost every day because it makes grocery shopping easier. I almost always order the exact same thing at restaurants.

Before I was married, I developed a series of rules called The Bachelor Protocols.  The eat-over-sink rule was part of that creed.

I’m now happily married, and I’ve learned a lot from my wife. The Bachelor Protocols are but a memory I recall only when I smell Burger King or drive by a sign for three-for-one pizzas. The protocols worked for my lifestyle at the time but were not ideal for nutrition.

I’m not a nutritionist, but I hope these very practical tips will complement all the science and data Crystal provides through 204 Lifestyle.  I hope they’ll also help those of you who aren’t doing the Nutrition Reset but still want to improve your diet.

Tip 1: Don’t Eat From the Bag or Box

While this tip definitely dirties far more dishes than Bachelor Mike would like, I can assure you that you will eat less if you put food—any food, but especially chips—in a bowl and put the rest of the bag away. Even better: Measure out your food and track it.

But start with the bowl. Put a reasonable amount of food into it, then eat the food slowly and enjoy it. When you’re done, you’ll have to make a conscious decision to get more, and you’ll have to get up to do it. All that presents a series of barriers that will often prevent you from overeating.

If you sit down with the bag, the mindless ritual hand-to-mouth delivery system kicks in, and before you know it the bag is empty, while you’re full of chips and regret.

So put reasonable amounts of stuff in bowls or on plates. When you’re done, you’re done. Go do something else—like listen to Iron Maiden while looking for hidden messages on the album cover. Or something like that.

Additional pro tip: Rinse the bowl or plate right away with hot water so you don’t have to scrub later. I hate scrubbing. It’s time I could spend shredding on the guitar.